A Customizable Approach to Restorative Justice School Discipline: Replacing Ineffective, Punitive Consequences with Human-Centered Educational Practices

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Webcast Details

Aired on: April 12th, 2016

3:30–4:30 p.m. (ET)

Presentation Slides

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Our Guest(s) This Week

Page Nichols

Page Nichols and Pender Makin, Co-Founders of Collaborative for Perpetual Innovation, have worked directly with Maine's most at risk adolescents in a number of capacities. Page has worked in an international sexual health clinic for young women, developed a teen parents program, served as a mentor for adjudicated youth, and for the past 7 years has served as the Restorative Justice Specialist for Maine’s largest regional alternative and day treatment school. Pender and Page have dedicated hundreds of volunteer hours working with disabled students in Maine’s locked juvenile justice facilities, and both have been appointed to Maine’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Group. Together, along with three colleagues, they co-founded Collaborative for Perpetual Innovation in order to widely share human-centered educational practices. Pender and Page speak locally and nationally on topics that include: Restorative Justice School Discipline; Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning; Classroom Management; and Brain-Based Strategies for Improving Organizational (and Personal) Affective Well-Being. Pender is a recipient of the Milken Educator Award and Maine’s Principal of the Year award; Page was recently honored with the Commissioner’s Award (for outstanding work with Maine’s at-risk youth) and the Youth Empowerment Award through the Maine Youth Action Network.

Pender Makin

Page Nichols and Pender Makin, Co-Founders of Collaborative for Perpetual Innovation, have worked directly with Maine's most at risk adolescents in a number of capacities. Pender has 20 years of experience as an educator and administrator in alternative and day treatment school settings and now serves as assistant superintendent of schools for Brunswick School Department. Pender and Page have dedicated hundreds of volunteer hours working with disabled students in Maine’s locked juvenile justice facilities, and both have been appointed to Maine’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Group. Together, along with three colleagues, they co-founded Collaborative for Perpetual Innovation in order to widely share human-centered educational practices. Pender and Page speak locally and nationally on topics that include: Restorative Justice School Discipline; Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning; Classroom Management; and Brain-Based Strategies for Improving Organizational (and Personal) Affective Well-Being. Pender is a recipient of the Milken Educator Award and Maine’s Principal of the Year award; Page was recently honored with the Commissioner’s Award (for outstanding work with Maine’s at-risk youth) and the Youth Empowerment Award through the Maine Youth Action Network.

This Week's Topic

Traditional school discipline tends to be one-size-fits-all, punitive in nature, and largely ineffective in changing student behavior. In fact, disciplinary practices that cause students to be removed from school for any length of time actually exacerbate most of the underlying causes of maladaptive behavior, contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline, and sever the already fragile connections to school, teachers, and peers that need to be strengthened in our most at-risk students.

Restorative disciplinary approaches, on the other hand, can deepen relationships, build character, repair communities, teach replacement behaviors, and foster resilience! Presented by two educators who have worked with highly at risk students in school, mental health, and juvenile justice settings, this webcast will provide viewers with the tools for implementing Restorative Justice Disciplinary Practices in any school or youth-serving setting. Viewers will:

  • Gain critical understandings about student misbehavior and about the way developing brains respond to school disciplinary practices

  • Learn how to implement restorative justice disciplinary approaches – on ANY scale (one individual teacher/classroom, a team, or an entire faculty can successfully implement the key practices … whole-school buy-in is not necessary for getting started!)

  • Learn tips for successful implementation (with students and with the other adults in your organization)

Resources:

Presentation Slides—Slides used in the presentation pdf

http://www.cpimaine.org/  CPI—Connect to our Web site which has links to our upcoming conference on Positive School Climate, several resource pages, and more information about Restorative Practices.

http://pendermakin.com/2016/02/16/resources-from-our-presentation-at-ndpcs-national-at-risk-youth-forum/
This is a link to the presentation we gave at the featured session at NDPC Forum.

http://www.livesinthebalance.org
Dr. Ross Greene’s site, which is full of wonderful free resources and research.

http://www.iirp.edu/pdf/ImprovingSchoolClimate.pdfpdf

Report on School Climate

http://schottfoundation.org/sites/default/files/restorative-practices-guide.pdfpdf

A user-friendly guide to restorative practices.

Functional Behavior Assessment—a worksheet for teachers to use in identifying the underlying causes of problematic student behavior.

12 Problems—This matrix provides descriptions of the common problems that cause maladaptive behavior. Teachers can proactively teach students about the problems and how to determine if one or more are impacting a student. This helps students to understand their own behaviors/reactions better and opens up a common language so these problems can be discussed in a group.

RLP Quick Referral and the “Here’s your kid back…” forms are examples of logistical forms to facilitate communication among teachers, counselors, and administrators when more than one adult is dealing with student behaviors/ responses.

“Rod’s” 7-step RLP worksheet takes the four steps of the restorative process and adds some tools for processing the “problems” (from previous document) that may underlie behavior, and quickly measures the student’s internal locus of control with respect to the incident/behavior.

For more information about any of these resources, email Pender and Page at educationinnovation.me@gmail.com