Who We Are

Our Mission

The mission of the National Dropout Prevention Center is to increase graduation rates through research and evidence-based solutions.

Since inception, the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) has worked to improve opportunities for all young people to fully develop the academic, social, work, and healthy life skills and dispositions needed to graduate from high school and lead productive lives. By helping school systems implement proven and innovative dropout prevention strategies and structures, NDPC has made a transformative impact on education from the local to the national level.

Our Work

The National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) was founded in 1986 to serve as a clearinghouse on issues related to dropout prevention and to offer research-based practices and strategies to increase graduation rates in schools across the U.S. Since inception, NDPC has become the nation’s leading resource for districts that wish to implement proven solutions to improve student outcomes. NDPC has done this through a variety of offerings such as professional development services, leadership and instructional support, national conferences, and sharing of evidence-based best practices. In addition, NDPC provides training programs for Trauma-Skilled Specialist Certification for practitioners and Trauma-Skilled School Model Certification for schools and districts.

Research

Major studies, peer-reviewed journal articles, presentations at professional conferences,research-to-practice briefs, collaboration with other agencies and institutions of higher learning.

Conferences, Forums, and Events:

Multiple national events held annually-networking and professional development opportunities, more than 1,700 conference attendees this year, 100% of U.S. states represented by attendees.

Webcasts:

Broadcasts focus on critical topics and feature invited experts. More than 80 produced and archived online.

Fellows Program

Invited academia and professionals collaborating nationwide to research dropout risk factors, strategies, and exemplary programs; dissemination of information and findings.

Customized Support Services:

Program Assessment Review (PARs), Diploma Planning Institutes (DPIs), Planning Effectively for School and Community Collaboration (P.E.R.C.), professional development seminars, workshops, and programs; Speakers for conferences and meetings.

Strategic Partnerships:

Strategic relationships and collaboration; working with local, state, and national agencies, organizations, and partners to support research and dissemination of information addressing the dropout crisis.

Membership

Major studies, peer-reviewed journal articles, presentations at professional conferences,research-to-practice briefs, collaboration with other agencies and institutions of higher learning.

Print

Quarterly NDPC/N Newsletter, The Journal of At-Risk Issues, ENGAGE: The International Journal of Research and Practices on School Engagement, position papers and issue briefs, infographics, and more than 100 print and online products for sale in the NDPC/N store.

Website

More than 140,000 yearly visitors; 366 model programs; 1,190 web pages of resources on dropout prevention, including archived copies of the monthly NDPC/N Newsletter Update.

Our Impact

Major Ways We Fulfill Our Mission
The mission of the National Dropout Prevention Center is to increase graduation rates through research and evidence-based solutions.

Our History

The National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) was begun in 1986 to serve as a clearinghouse on issues related to dropout prevention and to offer strategies designed to increase the graduation rate in America’s schools. Over the years, the NDPC has become a well-established national resource for sharing solutions for student success. It does so through its clearinghouse function, active research and evaluation projects, publications, and through a variety of professional development activities. In addition, the NDPC conducts a variety of third-party evaluations and Program Assessment and Reviews (PAR).

The National Dropout Prevention Center Thirtieth Anniversary Interviews

NDPC Director Dr. Sandy Addis reflects on the early days of dropout prevention work at the National Dropout Prevention Center with founding Director Dr. Dick Hamby, and longtime Executive Director Dr. Jay Smink, director for 25 of the Center’s 30 years at Clemson University. From identifying dropouts in the early years, to finding programs and projects and identifying successful strategies in communities, these distinguished gentlemen laid the foundation for our continued work in dropout prevention.

The National Dropout Prevention Center Thirtieth Anniversary Program

A look at 30 years. The National Dropout Prevention Center’s Thirtieth Anniversary Program was held October 24, 2016. The program opened with interviews with John Peters, Mr. Joseph and Dr. Judith Pauley, former Director Dr. Dick Hamby, Marty Duckenfield, former Executive Director Dr. Jay Smink, and Founding Dean Dr. George Petersen, and features video messages from the states of South Carolina, North Dakota, Montana, and California. The program includes contributions and remarks from NDPN Chair Mr. Bob Collins, and remarks from Director Dr. Sandy Addis, College of Education Founding Dean Dr. George Petersen, Governor and United States Secretary of Education Mr. Richard “Dick” Riley, former Executive Director Dr. Jay Smink, and Clemson University Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Dr. Robert H. Jones.

The National Dropout Prevention Center: Celebrating Twenty-Five Years

A video celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network in 2011. A look at the early history of the Center, from the National Dropout Prevention Fund, to the creation and merging of the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network, to the Fifteen Effective Strategies. The Center opened its doors on October 26, 1986, to research why students dropped out, and to create a network of the dissemination of information and resources easily accessible to educators, communities, policy leaders, and business leaders.

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