Family Involvement Makes a Difference

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Webcast Details

Aired on: September 14th, 2010

3:30–4:30 p.m. (ET)

Presentation Slides

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Our Guest(s) This Week

Pat Davenport

Pat Davenport is the Chief Executive Officer at Families and Schools Together, Inc (FAST). As an International Trainer and CEO of Families and Schools Together, Inc., Pat initiated and implemented the first FAST program through the CIS Network. Pat was the first CIS /Certified FAST trainer within the network of CIS and became a Certified Trainer consultant for Families and Schools Together, Inc. training several teams throughout the United States for individual and statewide initiatives. She has also been involved in developing, implementing, and training teams in Canada and the United Kingdom. Pat has represented Families and Schools Together, Inc. in various speaking engagements throughout the country.

This Week's Topic

In this broadcast, Pat Davenport, Chief Executive Officer of Families And Schools Together Inc. will address parent involvement in schools. She will talk about the importance of family involvement and highlight several key research findings about parent involvement. Davenport will  describe the various types of parent involvement and will feature a  multi-faceted evidence based program named FAST.  It was developed by  Dr. Lynn McDonald, a professor at Middlesex University in London, England.  FAST, through rigorous randomized trials, has shown an 80%  parent involvement retention rate, a decrease in aggression and an  increase in attention span. These are directly correlated with increased academic performance, reduction in dropout rates and reduced juvenile delinquency.

Resources:

Presentation Slides  pdf

McDonald, L., Moberg, P. D., Brown, R., Rodriguez-Espiricueta, I., Flores, N. I., Burke, M. P., et al. (2006).  After-School Multifamily Groups: A Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Low-Income, Urban, Latino Children  pdfChildren & Schools, 28(1), 25-34.

Caspe, M. S., Traub, F. E., & Little, P. (2002).  Beyond the Head Count: Evaluating Family Involvement in Out-of-School TimeIssues and Opportunities in Out-of-School Time Evaluation  pdf. Cambridge, MA : Harvard Family Research Project.

McDonald, L. (2005).  Building Social Capital to Engage Parents.

Epstein’s Framework of Six Types of Involvement  pdf.

Kratochwill, T. R., McDonald, L., Levin, J. R., Young Bear-Tibbetts, H., & Demaray, M. K. (2004).  Families and Schools Together: an experimental analysis of a parent-mediated multi-family group program for American Indian children  pdfJournal of School Psychology, 42, 359-383.

Kratochwill, T. R., McDonald, L., Levin, J. R., Scalia, P. A., & Coover, G. (2010).  Families and Schools Together: An Experimental Study of Multi-Family Support Groups for Children at Risk  pdf.

Families and Schools Together®(2010).

Caspe, M. S., Lopez, E. M., & Wolos, C. (2007).  Family Involvement in Elementary School Children’s Education  pdf . Family Involvement Makes a Difference. Cambridge, MA : Harvard Family Research Project.

National Evaluation of Family Support Programs  pdf(2001).   Cambridge, MA : Abt Associates, Inc..

National Parent Teacher Assocation (PTA)(2010).

Kaye, C. B. (1998).  Parent Involvement in Service-LearningLinking Learning with Life.

Parent Involvement Matters(2007).

National Dropout Prevention Center/Network (2010).  Video: Looking Back, Moving Forward: Families and Schools Together.

National Dropout Prevention Center/Network (2010).  Video: Pat Davenport, CEO of FAST.