Resources for Schools and Teachers During School Closings

School closures are traumatizing our students, families, and educators, presenting a new dropout risk factor and requiring us to develop immediate virtual solutions. The National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) offers topical videos and virtual professional development to support schools and educators during current uncertain times.

Video 1: The Trauma of Pandemic School Disruption. John Gailer, developer of the Trauma-Skilled Schools Model, explores the far-reaching implications of trauma related to school disruption for students, staffs, families, and the community at large. View video here https://youtu.be/c0adDQH4Hro

Video 2: School Disruption as a Dropout Risk Factor. Dr. Sandy Addis, Director of National Dropout Prevention Center, discusses the short- and long-term effects of school disruption on the nation’s dropout rates. View video here https://youtu.be/jeoWYeQuAWo.

Video 3: Virtual Learning in a Time of School Disruption. Ray McNulty, President of Successful Practices Network and National Dropout Prevention Center, explores the advantages of capitalizing on virtual learning. View video here https://youtu.be/Y29CjY7NLRA.

Online Trauma-Skilled Courses: Online courses can deliver high-impact virtual professional development to educators who must work remotely during extended school shut down periods. NDPC offers five online courses in the Trauma-Skilled Schools Model, one course for each step of the model. Each of the three-hour interactive virtual courses addresses a component of chronic stress and trauma. Together, the five courses prepare an educator to implement trauma-skilled measures and to support other educators in their work with trauma-impacted students.

 

Online Effective Dropout Prevention Strategies Courses: NDPC offers 16 online courses focusing on one of each research-based dropout prevention strategy. Each three- to five-hour interactive virtual courses addresses a specific dropout prevention strategy and prepares educators to apply the strategy to improve graduation outcomes. Online effective strategy courses can deliver high-impact virtual professional development to educators who must work remotely during extended school shut down periods.

Free or Reduced Cost Virtual Professional Development

Free:

Hundreds of videos, archived broadcasts, and downloadable publications are available at no cost on the NDPC website. School systems are encouraged to access these resources and have staff members utilize them as professional learning tools during times of school closure. These resources may be previewed and accessed at www.dropoutprevention.org.

Reduced Fees for Online Courses:

For a limited time, NDPC is providing blocks of online courses to schools and districts at significantly reduced cost. Rather than the standard cost of $99 per course, NDPC offers blocks of 50 courses at $50 per course, blocks of 100 courses at $40 per course, and blocks of 250 or more courses at $35 per course. Schools and districts wishing to purchase blocks of online courses for professional development during shutdown periods may review these courses at http://dropoutprevention.org/15-effective-strategies-online-courses/ and may send an email inquiry to ndpc@dropoutprevention.org.

Connect: NY Trauma Informed Education.

Episode 102

Webcasts

Dr. Sandy Addis, Director of the National Dropout Prevention Center, recently participated in a panel discussion with host Susan Arbetter of PBS affiliate WCNY, that explores incorporating trauma-informed practices into the classroom, why trauma is affecting more children, and looks at the skills educators are adopting to help them cope. Watch Dr. Addis on Connect: NY “Trauma Informed Education.”

AR/VR’s Role in Increasing Student Engagement Featuring NDPC Innovation Partner zSpace

Join zSpace, one of the National Dropout Prevention Center’s Innovation Partners; Dr. Shanan Chappell Moots, Director for Research Analytics at Old Dominion University and NDPC Research Fellow; and Dr. Sandy Addis, Director of the National Dropout Prevention Center, as they discuss how using AR/VR technology as an engagement tool for students takes on a new and exciting role in dropout prevention. Watch Video.

NDPC Now Offers Virtual Program Assessment (VPA) for Alternative Schools and Programs

With school shutdowns and re-openings, alternative schools will become more important and leaders should consider virtually reassessing those programs. The National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) now offers a Virtual Program Assessment (VPA) of alternative schools and programs. The NDPC Virtual Program Assessment provides expert analysis, consultation, and direction for the local school system to improve alternative programs at a lower cost than through an on-site Program Assessment and Review (PAR).  The Virtual Program Assessment process consists of the following steps:

  • Pre-visit consultation and planning with system and school leaders
  • Pre-visit collection of data and contextual information
  • Online pre-visit survey of program staff, leaders, and designated stakeholders on perceptions and activities relative to Focus Areas of Improvement
  • Analysis of data and survey findings by NDPC alternative school consultant
  • Virtual interviews with selected leaders to refine conclusions from online surveys
  • Development of draft VPA Report to address findings, areas for further investigation, recommendations, and next steps
  • Review of draft VPA Report with system leadership
  • Delivery of VPA Report to address findings, areas for further investigation, recommendations, resources, and suggested next steps.

Read more here.

Grant Support

Grant Project Components

The National Dropout Prevention Center offers a variety of cost-effective project components and supports that can be written into grants to strengthen your proposal, increase the likelihood of project success, and achieve long-term sustainability beyond grant funding. Review our list of grant project components or contact the National Dropout Prevention Center for assistance.

http://dropoutprevention.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/NDPC-Services.docx

Model Programs for Grants

The National Dropout Prevention Center's (NDPC's) Model Programs Database provides proven interventions for replication and inclusion in dropout prevention and school improvement grants. Proposals that replicate NDPC Model Programs are competitive and have high likelihood of achieving desired student outcomes. Visit the Model Programs Database or contact the National Dropout Prevention Center for assistance.

http://dropoutprevention.org/mpdb/web/search

 

 

Why Do Students Drop Out

girl-pensive

Several large longitudinal studies include questions asked of high school dropouts related to reasons for dropping out of school.

See some of the most frequent reasons reported over the last several decades in this NDPC article.

"Why Do Students Drop Out?"

Meet America's Certified Dropout Prevention Specialists

NDPSC8.25

Join the growing number of practitioners who are Certified National Dropout Prevention Specialists by enrolling in the National Dropout Prevention Specialist (NDPS) Certification Program for educators and at-risk youth workers. Certified Dropout Prevention Specialists complete a professional learning program founded in the Center's 15 Effective Dropout Prevention Strategies, document their experience by completion of a job-embedded field project, and serve as a national resource for others who work with at-risk youth.

Click here to meet the Certified Dropout Prevention Specialists, to learn from their work, and to access their Field Project Report.


NDPC Headlines

March 25, 2020

National Dropout Prevention Center Offers Resources for Schools and Teachers During School Closings

Anderson, SC (March 24, 2020) — School closures are traumatizing students, families, and educators, presenting a new dropout risk factor and requiring schools to develop immediate virtual solutions. The National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) has produced topical videos and virtual professional development to support schools and educators during current uncertain times. As an overview to the current… Read more »

February 11, 2020

Practice Guide for Improving Alternative Schools Issued by National Dropout Prevention Center

Offers clear and actionable process for school leaders for improving graduation rates of alternative schools  Anderson, SC—(February 10, 2020)—The National Dropout Prevention Center announces the release of a new guide for improving the effectiveness and the graduation rates of alternative schools. This practice guide offers a clear and actionable process and guiding questions that school… Read more »

December 18, 2019

National Dropout Prevention Center Announces Nation’s First Trauma-Skilled Specialist

Melisa Sandoval of Westminster Public Schools in Colorado Earns Certification Anderson, SC—(December 18, 2019)—The National Dropout Prevention Center, a division of Successful Practices Network, announces the nation’s first graduate of the Trauma-Skilled Specialist certification program. Melisa Sandoval, Support Director of Social Emotional Learning and Student Agency for Westminster Public Schools in Westminster, Colorado, completed the… Read more »

From the Web

March 10, 2020

Why trauma-informed teaching relies on trust

Educators must excel at building healthy, supportive relationships

In adopting trauma-informed teaching strategies, Nampa’s leaders discovered what their colleagues in other districts have also learned over the last few years: Students have a greater chance of coping with traumatic childhood experiences and succeeding in class when they can turn to a trusted adult at school.

It is, therefore, important that educators excel at building healthy, supportive relationships with young people. In that sense, classroom management in an era of trauma-informed teaching must now incorporate elements of counseling, Russell adds.

December 2, 2019

Bud Carlson Academy: NH’s first ‘trauma-skilled’ school

ROCHESTER — “How many of you have been homeless?” was the question. Half of the group raised their hands, not a one older than 18.

“My father was a drug addict and my mom was associated with bad people and was never really home,” said one student, who has attended eight different schools. “And then my parents were scattered all over the news. Kids picked on me. I was known for that at school, so I just started fighting people.”


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