The Good News About Cheating

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Webcast Details

Aired on: September 24th, 2013

3:30–4:30 p.m. (ET)

Presentation Slides

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Our Guest(s) This Week

Teddi Fishman

Teddi Fishman directs the International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI), a consortium of approximately 250 colleges, universities, and schools with more than 1000 individual members around the world. She has spoken on academic integrity topics in the U.S., the U.K., Israel, Egypt, South Africa, and Australia, promoting educational rather than punitive approaches to academic integrity. Fishman advocates for the development of cultures of integrity and for the cultivation of students’ ethical decision-making capacities. Her interest in ethics and integrity dates back to her pre-academic career as a police officer that inspired her master's thesis which she earned from Clemson University before completing her doctoral degree at Purdue. She believes that education, integrity, and interaction are key to building a more peaceful, just, and sustainable world.

This Week's Topic

It seems that every day there are new headlines about students cheating in school, but not everything is gloom and doom in the world of academic integrity. This session will focus on the positive work being done in the area to help students and schools develop cultures of integrity.

We will discuss:

  • Factors that affect cheating—both positive and negative
  • Steps teachers can take to reduce the incidences of cheating in their classrooms
  • Approaches to teaching responsible decision-making techniques
  • Suggestions on how to address academic integrity in the classroom

Resources:

Presentation Slides pdf

Williams, S. (2010).  A complete lesson plan on integrity with resources from the Alabama Learning Exchange.

An example of a positively framed integrity policy for high school students, teachers, parents, and administrators.(2012).

An example of a positively framed statement of integrity principles from Pine Forest Elementary in North Carolina(2012).

Garrett, J. (Ed.). (2011).  Building a Culture of Academic Integrity.http://www.depts.ttu.edu/centerforcampuslife/downloads/academicintegrity-magnawhitepaper.pdf pdf. (2013).

Educational resources for teachers from the International Center for Academic Integrity(2013).

International Center for Academic Integrity(2013).

Pope, D. (2012).  My View: Cheat or be cheated?CNN Schools of Thought blog.

Notes for Powerpoint pdf(2013).

Fishman, T., & Swanson, L. (2011).  Teachable Moments: Ethics and Reflection in Service-LearningLinking Learning with Life.

University of Maryland University College (2003).  VAILTutor Virtual Academic Integrity Laboratory.